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LEVEL 1
129  MEMBERS DID THIS ACTIVITY

Be A Modem

Transform information to share it in a new way.

Start your session with a community builder. For community builder suggestions, download the YDToolbox App

To build a sense of belonging, check in with members by asking a question like "What does it mean to you to connect to the internet?”

Tell members that they might be trying something brand new today, and remind them that asking questions is important. Revisit any expectations or norms around group discussion or using technology or devices in your Club.

WHAT YOU'LL NEED

Computer
WiFiInternet
 

STEP 1
TIME: 5 MINUTES

Practice Binary Numbers

A binary number is a number expressed in 0s and 1s. You can use this system to create any number. If you haven’t tried it yet, look at the Binary Digits activity or try using this website to look at how they are made. 
Members who are already familiar with binary numbers can review what they know, but members who are not may need a bit of extra time to understand. You can have them complete the Binary Numbers activity, or pair up members at different levels. For this activity, members only need to understand that a binary number such as 11001000 can be decoded into the number 200 and vice versa.

Try sharing this video from Math Bites. It also covers binary digits. 

STEP 2
TIME: 10 MINUTES

What Is A Modem?

Computers send lots of type of information back and forth when they are connected. We often say this information is “digital” because it’s made up of digits. Billions of ones and zeros get sorted into words, sounds, images and everything else you see on your screen.

We use a modem to transmit data between computers in different ways. For example, modems often used to connect over phone lines and transmitted in different sound frequencies. More recently, fiber-optic modems use light, which is much faster, instead.

The name modem comes from the term modulator-demodulator. Its job is to change the digital information to transmit, and then receive information to put back into digital form.

If you’d like to visualize this a little better, check out this example of a typical dial-up modem’s different frequencies. Those frequencies represent different types of information.

Take the number 200. In binary, it would be written 11001000, but we can modulate that number to make it easier to share. Instead of ones and zeros, try telling a friend the number using “beep” for one and “boop” for zero. You can substitute any type of noise (or even dance moves) that you’d like. See if you can correctly share your number with a friend.

Members may not be familiar with dial-up modems, but the concept is the same. If you’d prefer to visualize how fiber optics work, you can try this experiment

Modulating numbers can be done in partners or small groups. Have each group pick a number, write it binary and then share a modulation with the rest of the group to guess what it is.

STEP 3
TIME: 15 MINUTES

Look For Codes

Now that you can “code” your own information, see if you can recognize it in other places.

Watch this video and see if you can recognize all the codes in it.

You can also share this video on a projector, or just play the audio for a large group, and ask members to share what patterns and codes they recognize.

STEP 4
TIME:

Make Your Own

Create your own coded song or video. You can use the example you worked on above, or make a new one. Try creating a dance where the movements represent binary numbers or a song where the drums represent your 1 and 0.

Don't forget to upload your creations.

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